213. “The Hooterville Seven.”

The episode:Attack of the Giant Leeches,” ep. 406

The riff: Spoken in a deep, intimidating voice by Crow as a gaggle of country yokels drink booze and loiter in what appears to be the town’s general store.

The explanation: Crow seems to be making a joke about the shifty looks of this band of rural nogoodnicks, but the main part of the riff is the “Hooterville” reference. Hooterville was the name of a small, rural American town that was near the setting of two 1960s-1970s television shows, “Petticoat Junction” and its spin-off, “Green Acres.” Although the size and constitution of the town varied between the series, it shared a few recurring characters with both series and was meant to be an average American rural town.

Novelty factor: I know vaguely about the premise of both shows in question, but I don’t think I’ve ever even hard the name Hooterville before.

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3 thoughts on “213. “The Hooterville Seven.”

  1. Unfortunately to show my age, I watched both shows when they were in their prime. At the time I didn’t make the connection, but later it was brought to my attention that “Hooterville” was a play on words in reference to the opening credits of the three sisters who are taking a bath in the water tank.

    Also, I seem to recall in “Green Acres,” Eva Gabor would call it Hootersville.

    • I remember reading something during the research for this one that “hooters” didn’t really have today’s slang connotation when the series first went on the air, and that the implication of the nude girls was kind of coincidence to the name.

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